What Football Is Supposed To Look Like #11 – Stadion Special I (Gallery)

We do like a good mini-series within a series here at PyroOnThePitch.com and while compiling the latest What Football Is Supposed To Look Like special on heroic stadia of the past, it quickly became apparent that this too would be a multi-parter. Don’t expect the “best” or biggest grounds alone (or some of sort of all-time greats list), as we of course try and focus on all levels, but rather enjoy a specially prepared photo-collection (thanks as always to the original video uploaders, links at the bottom) of the features that made a few of our favourite archaic arenas legendary.

Goodison Park in the 70s, Everton vs Coventry City, Football League Division One, 26/11/1977:

65,000 in Estadio Centenario, Montevideo, watching the home side take a 2-0 lead en route to championship victory, Uruguay vs Brazil, Copa America final-1st leg, 27/10/1983:

Hebrew advertisements in Paris (and a French Adidas equipment shirt sans-Equipment logo), France vs Israel, World Cup qualifier, 13/10/1993:

The Irish Garda Band (police force) entertain the caged and walled crowd in Lansdowne Road ahead of the match, Republic of Ireland vs Northern Ireland, Euro qualifier, 20/09/1978:

Opening ceremony and away fans in Rheinstadion, Düsseldorf, ahead of West Germany vs Italy, European Championships group stage, 10/06/1988:

Dutch banners visible from space on the running track in Munich’s Olympiastadion, Netherlands vs USSR (neautral), European Championships final, 25/06/1988:

The sinister white fences of Westfalenstadion, Dortmund, West Germany vs Netherlands, friendly, 14/05/1986:

Cages around the dugout and German 80s bench fashion, Borussia Dortmund vs Schalke 04, Bundesliga, 01/12/1984:

Cars zip past on local infrastructure behind Eastville Stadium, Bristol Rovers vs Millwall, Football League Division Three, 08/05/1984:

Streamers fill the behind-goal no mans land during a famous European win for the home side (having already knocked Manchester United in the first round), Widzew Łódź vs Juventus, UEFA Cup second round-1st leg, 22/10/1980:

Classic East German scoreboard at the Bruno-Plache-Stadion, 1.FC Lokomotive Leipzig vs Bordeaux, UEFA Cup first round-2nd leg, 28/09/1983:

The weird and wonderful architecture, and police dogs, of Stadion Galgenwaard, FC Utrecht vs Ajax Amsterdam, Eredivisie, 02/03/1980:

The beauty of bare terraces in Ullevi Stadium, Gothenburg, Sweden vs England, Womens’ European Championship final-1st leg, 12/05/1984:

The strangely shaped grandstand of the aforementioned Ullevi, Gothenburg, CIS vs Netherlands (neutral), European Championships group stage, 12/06/1992:

Quintessential eastern block bowl, Nepstadion of Budapest, Hungary vs Romania, World Cup qualifier, 13/05/1981:

The inner-city dog-racing ground of Harold’s Cross, Dublin, Shelbourne vs St. Patrick’s Athletic, League of Ireland, 1987/88:

The terraces, fences, and police of the not very Olympic Olympiastadion of Club Brugge vs Royal Antwerp, Belgian First Division, 26/01/1992:

Tranway End, Dalymount Park, St. Patrick’s Athletic vs Waterford FC (neutral), FAI Cup final, 20/04/1980:

The majesty of the old Mestalla, Valencia CF vs Real Madrid, La Liga, 05/01/1986:

Scenes from a snowy De Kuip (The Tub), Feyenoord Rotterdam vs Ajax Amsterdam, Eredivisie, 07/12/1980:

A football match on a building site as renovations take place at Stadio Luigi Ferraris in preparation for Italia 90, Genoa vs Lecce, Serie B, 01/05/1988:

Antique analog scoreboard still around years after it’s time, Vojvodina Stadium, Novi Sad, Yugoslavia vs Greece, friendly, 20/09/1989:

Great aerial shot of the Mambourg stadium surrounded by city, Royal Charleroi Sporting Club vs Anderlecht, Belgian First Division, 19/04/1994:

One more eastern block bowl, Vasil Levski National Stadium (named after a Bulgarian 19th century patriot and revolutionary, as also referenced by tenant club PFC Levski Sofia), Sofia, Bulgaria vs Switzerland, Euro qualifier, 01/05/1991:

Arms and banners of Granata Ultras, Stadio Comunale Vittorio Pozzo, Torino vs Ascoli, Serie A 04/06/1989:

A sophisticated enclosure at the Constant Vanden Stock Stadium, Anderlecht vs Ballymena United, Cup Winners’ Cup first round-1st leg, 13/09/1989:

Time for athletics, Flamurtari Stadium, Albania vs Romania, Euro qualifier, 28/10/1987:

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YouTube Links:

Everton vs Coventry City, 1977
Uruguay vs Brazil, 1983
France vs Israel, 1993
Republic of Ireland vs Northern Ireland, 1978 (BBC)
West Germany vs Italy, 1988
Netherlands vs USSR, 1988
West Germany vs Netherlands, 1986
Borussia Dortmund vs Schalke 04, 1984
Bristol Rovers vs Millwall, 1984
1.FC Lokomotive Leipzig vs Bordeaux, 1983
FC Utrecht vs Ajax Amsterdam, 1980
Sweden vs England, 1984
CIS vs Netherlands, 1992
Hungary vs Romania 1981
Shelbourne vs St. Patrick’s Athletic, 1987/88
Club Brugge vs Royal Antwerp, 1992
St. Patrick’s Athletic vs Waterford FC, 1980
Valencia vs Real Madrid, 1986
Feyenoord Rotterdam vs Ajax Amsterdam, 1980
Genoa vs Lecce, 1988
Bulgaria vs Switzerland, 1991
Torino vs Ascoli, 1989
Anderlecht vs Ballymena United, 1989
Albania vs Romania, 1987

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Pyro On The Pitch #16: Atalanta vs Dinamo Zagreb, UEFA Cup First Round-1st Leg, 19/09/1990

Last time in Pyro On The Pitch (the flagship series here on the coincidentally named PyroOnThePitch.com) we looked at Balkan behemoths Hajduk Split and their historic Torcida group. Of course, Croatia is home to more than one infamously supported team and for fairness it is to Hajduk’s great national rivals of Dinamo Zagreb that we now turn, as well as their Italian hosts on the day Atalanta.

Background

Starting with the home side in our featured match, 1976 was a pivotal year in the supporter culture history of Atalanta due to the foundation of the club’s first ultras group: Brigate Neroazzure (Black-Blue Brigade; BNA). With an organised support-base of that swung to the left, the BNA were later joined on the home Curva Nord by many other groups such as: Armata (Army); Biamo Persi (We Lost); Berghem Blues; Brigata Suicida (Suicide Brigade); Fellows; Nomadi (Nomads); Panthers; Ragazze Curva Nord (North Curve Girls), Sbandati (Stragglers); Stoned; Teste Matte (Dull Heads – stoners); and Wild Kaos, amongst others.


The amazing banner of "Ragazze Curva Nord" (North Curve Girls), Atalanta vs Genoa, Serie B, 14/06/1981.

As the club’s only initial appearance in continental competition was a Cup Winners’ Cup cameo in 1963, the new style of fan had to wait until the 1987/88 season to travel outside Italy when Atalanta’s 87 Coppa Italia win meant entry to the same UEFA competition. A great run – the highlight being a quarter-final victory over Sporting Lisbon, the same opposition who had caused eliminated back in 63 – was only ended by eventual champions KV Mechelen in the semis, giving the hardcore support their most exciting year to date.


A sea of sparklers in the Curva Nord of Atalanta's Stadio Atleti Azzurri d'Italia ahead of the Cup Winners' Cup quarter final-1st leg against Sporting Club, 01/03/88.

Supporters hold up the letters "SIAMO CON VI" (We are with you) during Atalanta's 2-0 UEFA Cup quarter-final victory over Sporting, the greatest European home night in the club's history, 01/03/88.

The following season, a 6th place finish in Serie A secured more European football with qualification for the UEFA Cup, although the club’s debut campaign in the competition was cut short with a 0-2 aggregate loss to Spartak Moscow in the First Round. In 89/90, the Bergamo-based side dropped a place in the league to 7th, but this was still enough to qualify for Europe; even 8th would have been enough as 4th place Juventus and 5th place Sampdoria were both entering the Cup Winners’ Cup as Coppa and CWC holders respectively, lowering the last UEFA Cup spot from 6th to 8th.


A banana display (presumably not racist) and text banner from Atalanta's ultras, with their team on their way to a UEFA Cup qualification league finish. Atalanta vs Roma, Serie A, 21/01/1990.

In comparison, Dinamo Zagreb held a rich continental tradition that dated back to 1958 when the club first represented Yugoslavia in the European Cup. Since then, many Cup Winners’ Cup and Inter-City Fairs/UEFA Cup appearances had come in the 60s, 70s and 80s, with another European Cup spot not achieved until 1982 (the middle of three successive eliminations in the first round of European competitions by the three big Portuguese clubs – Benfica in CWC 80/81; Sporting in EC 82/83; Porto in CWC 83/84).

Somewhat surprisingly (considering the mythical 1950 foundation date of Hajduk Split’s Torcida), the club’s main support group were not yet around for this period. But of course being one of the top Balkan sides, a passionate support base adequately encouraged the team even without an organised fan unit.


Dinamo Zagreb supporters ahead of a Yugoslav First League match against Red Star Belgrade, 1982.

In 1986 things changed forever with the founding of Dinamo’s most infamous support group, the Bad Blue Boys (BBB), who quickly demonstrated a propensity for pryo much like their hated Hajduk enemies. Unlike with Atalanta’s many ultra groups, BBB was an umbrella for different branches of support to come together under the same name, resulting in a lot of a BBB banners representing different areas of Zagreb at games.


Hell is unleashed by the BBB pyromaniacs, Dinamo Zagreb vs Hajduk Split, Yugoslav First League, 17/09/1989.

The club’s next appearance in Europe was the 88/89 UEFA Cup, defeating Beşiktaş before elimination at the hands of Stuttgart. The following year they would compete also, but without even getting to the first round – quite a feat in the days before qualification stages.

The odd situation had occurred due to the continuing ban on English teams following the Heysel disaster (it’s last season in place), meaning extra spots were up for grabs in continental competitions. To decide one of the places, two clubs from the nations of France and Yugoslavia, who were level in UEFA’s own ranking system, were selected for a play-off: 5th placed Ligue 1 side Auxerre, who would have missed out except for 3rd placed Monaco’s Cup Winners Cup entry as Coupe De France holders; and 5th from the Yugoslav First League Dinamo Zagreb, who only received the nomination due to 4th placed Hajduk Split’s European ban following to the events discussed in POTP#15.


Another pyro-fest courtesy of BBB during the Dinamo Zagreb vs Auxerre UEFA Cup preliminary round-1st leg match, 23/08/1989.

Despite the early elimination at the hands of Auxerre, Dinamo did progress that season by finishing second in the league behind Red Star Belgrade and hence returned to honorably securing a UEFA Cup spot rather than only thanks to the Hajduk and English club bans (this time that went to Partizan Belgrade who finished in 4th behind a Hajduk still in continental exile). The draw for the 90/91 tournament pitted Dinamo against, of course, Italy’s Atalanta, who’s first ever meeting with a club from a socialist state the previous year in Spartak was now followed by a second (although neither would be for long).

Thankfully for our needs, Dinamo fans (and perhaps Balkan folk in general) are great videographers, with two to three dedicated camera-fans present to record events before and during our featured match. One of these videos, which are now on YouTube, is over and hour and a half long and includes scenes from the BBB road trip to Bergamo. Well worth a watch on a lazy sunday afternoon withe family.

The Match

Bergamo, 19/09/1990:

After making the 6+ hour journey from Zagreb to Bergamo, some Dinamo fans head for the stadium early to watch a light training section and erect a large flag. Even with the middle obscured, the colourscheme of red/white/blue indicates that it is the flag of Croatia, rather than the blue/white/red of the country Dinamo was officially representing, Yugoslavia (although pluralist elections had already taken place in the Yugoslav Socialist Republic of Croatia, the results of which indicated independence):

One supporter – clearly a BBB leader – chats with one of the youth players before being approached by, and shaking hands with, an older Dinamo staff member:

The same supporter makes a speech to some of his fellow hardcore fans (one of whom looks slightly out of place) in which he says something along the lines of “Let’s go to that lake, if someone fucks with us, we’ll fight them., if the players don’t give a fuck about us, and we came two days early, we’ll go against everyone”:

So from this was can gather that some fans had in fact already been in town for a couple of days. As the supporters take down their flag and leave the stadium for now (presumably heading for a lovely lake) elsewhere in the city more Croatian flags are paraded through various tree-lined boulevards:

As fans make their way towards Atalanta’s ground, there is more than one instance of pyro on the pavements:

Some skirmishes with local police also occur, including running battles in the car park of outside the away sector of the stadium:

Some who are already inside lend their assistance from an excellent vantage point:

Those who do make it inside begin adorning the sector in Dinamo banners and Croatian flags. There are many reference to BBB, but also separate or sub-group called Total Chaos are represented:

With kick-off growing close and the stand filling up, bar those who had been apprehended outside, the atmosphere grows:

It quickly becomes clear that the passionate Dinamo fans display more ultra-actions before the players even come out that most club’s fans do during an entire match:

One supporter can be seen in a Glasgow Celtic shirt, presumably in reference to the Catholic faith shared by many Croatians and, traditionally, Celtic fans:

On the other side, another gives a salute that most likely be met with disgust by the quite left identifying Celtic hardcore:

And in the background, a Union Jack – in theory a representation of many who would find the Nazis and/or Celtic abhorrent, but used as a right-wing symbol in many eastern European countries at the time – completes the trifecta, demonstrating the unique complexities of supporter culture symbolism and ideology:

The TV broadcast opens displaying the beautiful crests of both sides, which incidentally both feature left-to-right diagonal divides, in rectangular form:

Cutting to to the Stadio Atleti Azzurri d’Italia – Blue Athletes Stadium of Italy, a ground ironically built and associated with the Mussolini era – a nice view of some downtown Bergamo architecture sets the backdrop as the player profiles are flashed on screen:

The cameras also catch the away fans at a rather uncharacteristically subdued moment:

At Curva Nord, with the banners of groups such as the aforementioned Wild Kaos at the back of the stand and BNA and Teste Matte at the front, a ginormous blue and black crowd-cover emerges and unravels upwards from the bottom of the section as the players are about to walk out:

One Croatian camera-wizard gets an excellent shot of this through the fence at the other end:

The players walk up a flight of stairs from the deep, mysterious labyrinth beneath the pitch and proceed to a superfluous, white tunnel for sponsorship purposes that extends far onto the grass. On cue, red glares and smoke begin to light up the home end:

The two teams finally emerge into daylight just as many flares come raining down onto the pitch:

Thanks to the tunnel’s length, the players are safely out of range from the firestorm, suggesting that perhaps the purpose of the tunnel wasn’t merely for ad-space after all but also protection from such events as this:

The pyro is quickly cleared from the pitch and the massive crowd-cover retracted, but the Atalanta ultras aren’t done yet. A just as impressive spectacle is next as huge mass of blue smoke engulfs the entire end:

All seems suspiciously quite in the away section as the game begins, but less that ten minutes later the suspicions are confirmed. Another inferno erupts from the Dinamo faithful and many of the flares are quickly sent pitchward:

The referee has no choice but to stop the match as the hot-hail continues:

As the rest of the stadium waits around in annoyance, or probably more like bemusement from the ultras, the travelling supporters relish their pyro party in Bergamo:

A fearless photographer and coach confront the disruptives, casually side stepping the very real threat of the flares raining down around them in a way that demonstrates years of experience with such fans:

As other rush to help remove the hazards, one Dinamo player uses his skills as a professional football to kick a flare away:

Others simply watch on in mild concern:

Soon though, concern levels probably do rise as it becomes apparent that several fires have started; unsurprising considering the sheer scale of pyro still being launched:

Some of the away fans’ banners have been destroyed by the heat of their own flares, but the memories will last a lifetime:

One flare lands a little too closer to some of the home fans in the main grandstand, prompting several frustrated hand gestures:

Most BBB and the rest of the Dinamo fans care little however, including at least on pensioner as seen below enjoying the festive scenes. More supporters can be seen capturing the magic moment including both photo cameras…:

…and large camcorder, perhaps even one of the those who filmed some of the very gifs we are using:

As the referee walks over to inspect the situation with the clock just past ten minutes, a graphic displaying the time and 0-0 scoreline reveals an oversight with the inversion of Dinamo’s crest/flag for presentation purposes – Binamo?

With the flares finally all burned out, the Croats continue following the home fans lead by now unleashing some smoke in yellow and purple:

Inevitably, some of this also ends up on the pitch right in front of an Atalanta group banner for the “Fedelissimi”, Loyalists – an incredibly common title used used by fans of most clubs in Italy:

Both sets of supporters are now fully out of ammo and it proves to be the high point of the match, which ends in a scoreless draw.

Aftermath:

While the return leg in Zagreb deserves it’s own specific look, needless to say there was plenty more pyro from the soon to be free Croatians in attendance. One player who had already been involved in a pivotal event in the lead-up to the war of independence, Boban, scored to make it 1-0, but an equalisier shortly thereafter was enough to give Atalanta the tie on away goals.:

The game would turn out to be the last that Dinamo Zagreb would play under that name as a Yugoslav club. In the following season’s competition, they competed as HAŠK Građanski, reflecting the clubs original identity of “HŠK Građanski” (First Croatian Citizens’ Sports Club) in 1911, before becoming the unpopularly titled Croatia Zagreb by the time of the 93/94 Champions League, but doing so as the first side from an – by then – independent Croatia to compete at Europe’s highest level.

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YouTube Links:

Atalanta vs Genoa, 1981
Atalanta vs Sporting, 1988
Dinamo Zagreb vs Red Star Belgrade, 1982
Dinamo Zagreb vs Hajduk Split, 1989
Dinamo Zagreb vs Auxerre, 1989
Atalanta vs Roma, 1990
Atalanta vs Dinamo Zagreb, 1990
Atalanta vs Dinamo Zagreb, 1990
BBB in Bergamo A, 1990
BBB in Bergamo B, 1990

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Football Special Report #9 – Aston Villa vs Barcelona, UEFA Super Cup-2nd leg, 26/01/1983

It feels like an age since our last online Football Special Report (with a Shelbourne Fanzine exclusive installment since then), when we examined Euro 84 game by game. As long term readers might remember from our look at the German east vs west post-reunification clash between Stahl Brandenburg and Bayer 05 Uerdingen, we also love a good “game descending into farce” with several red cards along the way and luckily the UEFA Super Cup of 1983 delivered on both fronts.

Credit to the YouTube uploaders who make these posts possible.

Background:

Since we have already looked at Aston Villa’s European Cup semi final of 1982 away to Anderlecht (People On The Pitch #1), that seems like a good place to start.

Amid crowd trouble and police intervention on the unsegregated terrace behind the goal, and indeed a supporter on the pitch, the 0-0 score at full time meant that Villa’s 1-0 win from the home leg was enough to take them through to the final for the first time. While it would be Villa’s debut at this stage in the competition, it was an unprecedented six in a row for English finalists (winning all of them), beating Spain’s five through Real Madrid in the 50s and early 60s.


Anderlecht and Aston Villa's European Cup semi-final 2nd leg is held up due to a pitch invader, April 21th, 1982.

The domination on the pitch was mirrored by the domination off – and sometimes on again – by the English clubs’ hooligans, who’s example was now being followed by many of their continental counterparts after meetings throughout the years in UEFA’s three tournaments. Or four if you count the UEFA Super Cup. The 1982 final between Villa and Bayern Munich in De Kuip, Rotterdam, seemed perfectly primed for trouble, with the Dutch lowlands a suitable battle-field for the invading English and German drunken armies.





Scenes before the 1982 European Cup final in Rotterdam, with a passed out Bayern fan above, and a dancing Villa supporter below, May 26th, 1982.

Of course arrests in the city before the game were inevitable, and the stadium had already been the scene of Feyenoord, the police and Tottenham’s infamous clash in the stands at the 1974 UEFA Cup final (and again the following year). But, with the two main sets of supporters kept far apart in either end and prevented by De Kuip’s imposing “railings” from any serious encroachment attempt, no major trouble broke out during the final.




Arrests being made before the European Cup final for minor incidents, Rotterdam, May 26th, 1982.

A segment of the Aston Villa end at De Kuip Stadium, Rotterdam, during the European Cup final vs Bayern Munich, May 26th, 1982.

Aston Villa completed the English “six in a row” (made 7 out of 8 a couple of years later), reaching the pinnacle of the club’s history with a 1-0 win over Bayern thanks to a 67th minute goal by Peter Withe. Elsewhere in Europe, IFK Göteborg of Sweden hit their own personal high by winning the UEFA Cup, defeating Hamburg over two legs in the final (a feat repeated in 1987 by beating Dundee United).

At the time of writing, this would have meant Villa and Göteborg – as the two continental cup winners – facing each other at the start of the following season in the “Super Cup”. But modern fans may forget that this was not always the case, as at one stage the long, lost Cup Winners’ Cup was considered equal to, or more important, than the UEFA Cup. After all, entrants to the Cup Winners’ Cup had – obviously – won something to get there, while the UEFA Cup sides had “merely” finished respectably the league without any silverware to show for it.

Therefore, Villa’s future opponents had been decided back on May 12th in the Camp Nou when Barcelona defeated Belgium’s Standard Liege 2-1 in the CWC final, powered by the Danish striker Allan Simonsen.


Barcelona fans celebrate, off and on the pitch, their side winning the Cup Winners' Cup final vs Standard Liege, May 12, 1982.

More differences to the modern version of the Super Cup – which was originally introduced following the 1972/73 season – included the fact it too was a two-legged home and away affair, rather than held in a neutral venue (until 1998 when Monaco’s Stade Louis II began 15 years of hosting a one-off game instead).  Another was that the matches were played in January of the following year, meaning that the culmination of the season that had started back with the preliminary round of the Cup Winners’ Cup on August 19th, 1981, didn’t arrive until early 1983.

So the 1982 Super Cup was actually taking place in 83 (it would turn out to be the last year of this practice as the next edition was scheduled for November and December, resulting in two Super Cup finals in the same calendar year). At the first leg on Wednesday, January 19th, in the New Camp – on front of only 40,000 compared to the 100,000 in attendance for the Cup Winners’ Cup final – Spanish international Marcos Alonso gave the Catalans a 1-0 lead to take to England for the conclusion a week later.

The Match:

Aston Villa vs Barcelona, Villa Park, Birmingham, 26/01/1983: As with the first match in the tie, Villa Park is by no means full for the second leg, although the 31,000+ is still a respectable number for a Wednesday night:

As you all should know from our What Football Is Supposed To Look Like galleries, we love classic graphics and we get some good ones here, including substitutes:

As glimpsed above, the away side are wearing one of their all-time great attires, featuring a red/blue vertical strip over the glorious yellow background:

The home club’s Le Coq Sportif kit is not too shabby either (with matching dual sweatbands as standard):

Early on we can see that several sections of terrace behind the goal are completely closed-off, accounting for some of the “missing” support:

Along with some empty seats on the far side of the pitch near the corner:

At the other, huge “Holt End”, it is a different story in the enclosures:

The Villa Park pitch is also looking in quite commendable condition (compare to a UEFA Cup game against Dynamo Kiev the year before):

The handsomely dressed – but, as it turns out, dastardly – Barca team quickly put themselves on the home crowd’s bad side, with this later report from one fan in attendance explaining why (according to a YouTube comment):

The most obscene team performance I have ever been present at in football. Barcelona that night were disgusting. Cynical and clinical fouls, atrocious behaviour shoving the referee and the like. Punches thrown, kicks and appalling tackles.
More on that later. But the real action – the “descending into farce” part – begins in the second half, starting with one of the more bizarre offences you’ll see on a football pitch.

As a Villa player launches the ball forward, defender Julio Alberto suddenly plucks the it out of the air with his hands in an almost instinctual manner. As the referee blows the whistle and the crowd loose their sh*t, some of Alberto’s teammates have the gall to protest his yellow card:

The move did no favours for the English perception of swarthy, spineless, cheating foreigners. Soon, stupidity is added to this list, or simply a wish to get sent off, as it is realised that Alberto is already on a yellow card (as many other Barca players by this stage):

The red card is presented much to the delight of the home fans and the disappointment of Julio Alberto, who had only joined Barcelona after they had won the Cup Winners’ Cup so he probably shouldn’t have been allowed there anyway:

Villa, of course, are more than happy to return in kind the actions of the “dirty foreigners”, as demonstrated by this punch that receives a yellow:

Before another tasty tackle from the away side:

The behaviour on the pitch has tens of thousands in the stands seething, yet Barca are still leading in the tie. In the 80th minute, however, a set piece attempt from Villa goes awry…:

…which inadvertently leads to the chance for Gary Shaw to make it 1-0 on the night and 1-1 on aggregate. The Holt End explodes:

The game goes to extra-time and on 100 minutes a Villa player is pushed down from behind in the box. Penalty:

Many of the players in yellow immediate rush to the referee – Alexis Ponnet of Belgium – to enthusiastically dispute the call:

But the clearly gallant and chivalrous goalkeeper Javier Urruticoechea – commonly known as Urruti – steps in to aggressively shield Ponnet from his teammates (literally hopping at them at one stage), much to the ref’s annoyance:

After order is restored, it initially seems that Urruti’s charity has resulted good karma as he saves Gordon Cowans’ penalty, but the future Bari player slots it in on the rebound. As Cowans lashes the ball into the net one more time in celebration, the ‘keeper suddenly scythes down the goalscorer – surely just an accidental slip:

The Aston Villa players don’t think so and advance. The brave Urruti rushes out to meet them, fists raised:

With a cheeky grin, Villa’s number 3 Colin Gibson – who is clearly reveling in all this fun – engages in a little shadow boxing of his own:

We also see that the Barcelona goalkeeper shirt is Adidas-made, rather than the Meyba jerseys of the outfielders:

Eventually everyone backs off:

Amazingly, only four minutes later a ball is swung into the box by the home side and met with a brilliant header from Scotsman Ken McNaught. Urruti’s palm is not enough to keep it out:

Now the score is 3-0 to Villa on the night, 3-1 overall. Barcelona’s chances of a comeback are diminished further before the ball is even kicked again, as, on the linesman’s advice, Ponnet jogs over to the hero from the 1st leg Marcos Alonso and presents him with a red card for an off the ball incident:

Barca captain Tente Sánchez passionately pleads with the ref that Alonoso himself had been the victim of an elbow. In the background, one of their comrades holds a sort of hanky to his nose as a clotting agent after an earlier incident, with blood already smeered across the front of his jersey:

After all this, there is still time for more. In the second half of extra time, Allan Evans – another Scot – lazily lunges at poor old Tente, who feigns retaliation before quickly turning his attention to the Belgian referee instead:

As the ref deliberates, we can see number 3, Migueli, is still playing on holding his bloody nose:

And his mess of a bloody shirt on the right:

It turns out to be Evans’ second yellow card offence and he too is off, much to his shock and dismay:

Finally, after quite an exhausting, violent and entertaining evening, the tie finished 3-1 to Aston Villa. It would turn out to be a fitting end to this golden-era, and their last piece of European silverware until an Intertoto Cup win in 2001. But that is a story for another day.

Rest in peace Javier “Urruti” Urruticoechea, who died in a road accident in 2001. Forever in the POTP Hall of Heroes.

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YouTube links:
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