Heroic Hang Jobs #7 (Gallery)

Welcome back to another installment of Heroic Hang Jobs, the series that celebrates old-style flag and banner hanging. As per usual, here we look at a selection of different clubs and countries, from different eras and to different scales, but some specialised episodes of HHJ are in the pipeline.

Shelbourne vs Glenmore Celtic, Tolka Park, Dublin, FAI Cup quarter-final, 1993:

Ajax Amsterdam vs Lokomotive Leipzig, Olympic Stadium, Athens, Cup Winners’ Cup final, 13/05/1987:

Ajax Amsterdam vs KV Mechelen, Stade de la Meinau, Strasbourg, Cup Winners’ Cup final, 11/05/1988:

KV Mechelen vs Ajax Amsterdam, Stade de la Meinau, Strasbourg, Cup Winners’ Cup final, 11/05/1988:

Ireland vs Scotland, Lansdowne Road, Dublin, friendly, 30/05/2000:

PSV Eindhoven vs AZ Alkmaar, Philips Stadion, Eindhoven, Eredivisie, 28/09/1985:
West Germany vs Spain, Niedersachsenstadion, Hannover, friendly, 15/10/1986:

Wisła Kraków vs ???, 1990s:

Bayern Munich vs AC Milan, Olympic Stadium, Munich, European Cup semi final-2nd leg, 18/04/1990:

Bayern Munich vs AC Milan, Olympic Stadium, Munich, European Cup semi final-2nd leg, 18/04/1990:

Bayern Munich vs AC Milan, Olympic Stadium, Munich, European Cup semi final-2nd leg, 18/04/1990:

Northern Ireland vs Ireland, World Cup qualifier, Windsor Park, Belfast, 14/09/1988:

Dinamo Zagreb vs Red Star Belgrade, Stadion Maksimir, Zagreb, Yugoslav First League, 13/05/1990:

Ireland vs Turkey, Lansdowne Road, Dublin, European Championships qualifier, 17/10/1990:

Cagliari vs Cremonese, Stadio Sant’Elia, Cagliari, Serie A, 15/09/1992:

Royal Antwerp (featuring Feyenoord) vs Club Brugge, Bosuilstadion, Antwerp, Belgian First Division A, 27/02/1988:

Japan vs Iraq, Khalifa International Stadium, Doha, Qatar, World Cup qualifier, 28/10/1993:

US Pergocrema vs US Allasandria, Stadio Giuseppe Voltini, Crema, Serie C2-Group B, 06/02/1988:

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YouTube links:

Shelbourne vs Glenmore Celtic, 1993
Ajax vs Lokomotive Leipzig, 1987
Ajax vs Mechelen, 1988
Ireland vs Scotland, 2000
PSV Eindhoven vs AZ Alkmaar, 1985
West Germany vs Spain, 1986
Bayern Munich vs Milan, 1990
Northern Ireland vs Ireland, 1988
Dinamo Zagreb vs Red Star Belgrade, 1990
Ireland vs Turkey, 1990
Cagliari vs Cremonese, 1992

Royal Antwerp vs Club Brugge, 1988
Japan vs Iraq, 1993
Pergocrema vs Alessandria, 1988

*****

 

Retro Shirt Reviews #10

Previously in Retro Shirt Reviews we released the originally Shelbourne-fanzine-exclusive RSR#7, taking a special look at that club’s less-documented kit past, but our last true installment was RSR#9 with this mid-late 80s long-sleeve Adidas beaut. If you enjoyed that then you are in for a treat, as we now return with more historic wonders of the football kit-related variety.

  • Club: “Tischler”
  • Year: circa 1984
  • Make: Adidas
  • Template: “Aberdeen”
  • Sponsor: Sport Schöll
  • Number: 4
  • Similarly Worn By: West Germany, Romania, 1984; Schalke, Independiente, PSV, USSR, 1985; East Germany, 1986

If the details listed above look familiar then you are correct, as this is another shirt from the same team that appeared in RSR#9. As is German tradition, the name of the club appears on the back above the number (sometimes seen below) to let us know that this another ‘Tischler’ jersey, which translates to carpenter or joiner. This is not even the first workers/union side of the sort that we have featured following the late-70s Adidas-Erima shirt (sadly sans the trefoil) from RSR#4, the large, amazing woodpecker-logo of which suggests a similar trade.

Unfolding the beautiful, long, three-striped sleeves, we can reveal that this is of course the Adidas “Aberdeen” template (which we all now know the name of, and some other classics, thanks to @TrueColoursKits), with it’s trademark horizontal shadow-stripes and matching collar’n’cuffs, popularly used at the time of it’s release:

This means that we have gone back in time (as is our want) by having already highlighted Tischler’s next jersey after this in RSR#9, as the design was first seen (at least widely) employed by West Germany and Romania at Euro 84 (discussed in Football Special Report #7). Many club sides around the world and other internationals took on the simple but pleasing look over the next two years, in many different colourways, but the most obvious comparison to our version comes from Schalke 04’s 85/86 kit, that used an incidental shirt apart from the sponsor.

As with it’s successor, the sponsor here is Sport Schöll, which we at first erroneously assumed meant Sports School (that would be “Sportschule“). But seemingly, Schöll is simply a family name and Sport Schöll appears to be a sports shop. The close-up also gives us a good look at that oh-so-nice shadow-striping:

Zooming in even closer to the brand logo, we can see that unlike the later shirt, where they were sublimated, the ‘adidas’ and trefoil are printed on and beginning to fade. This was also of an era where the logo-to-wordmark ratio wasn’t what it would become, as the letters are slightly smaller than what you might expect, with the extra “slits” on the trefoil also indicating the early-mid 80s production:

The other stand-out feature of this jersey, apart from the shadow-stripes, is the marvelous v-neck collar and matching cuffs, for which we are grateful to possess a long-sleeved version. As well as the iconic cross-over on the v-neck, the additional blue trim perfectly frames this sublime garment and makes the whole thing pop:

We have already mentioned the sleeve-stripes, but it is always worth re-iterating how great they look when given more length, for which we thank the elements of winter. The label, at which we also sometimes look at, is too creased to properly display, but it is the exact same as that which appeared on the other Tischler model.

Lastly, as usual, we turn over to the back. The same font for the name and the classy “box”-style number that would be seen on the 1986 shirt are already here, with the latter unfortunately not in the best condition. Still, this jersey is clearly a priceless artifact:

International Selection:

Continuing the German theme (which is continued a lot on here, and will remain so continued), we have a unique International Selection with two t-shirts born from Adidas inspiration on both sides of the formerly-divided nation. Unlike our vintage masterpiece above, these are modern “Adidas Originals” creations, which – while perhaps as morally questionable as any mass-produced item from a global, capitalist brand – can certainly still be stunning.

Starting with with the west, here we have an official Germany t-shirt that combines elements of two eras. The most obvious feature, clearly drawing inspiration from the World Cup 94 template, is the striking black, red and yellow pinstripes that stunningly combine to create large diamonds, echoing the original, which meet in the middle as if mirrored:

The abstract design can be interpreted in several ways, depending on how your eyes perceive it. In contrast are the understated, white-on-white stripes on the sleeves, which are not instantly visible. The black v-neck, meanwhile, along with the general shape and feel of the shirt, clearly hearken back to the minimal pre-Adidas West German jersey of the 1960s and 70s:

On the back we get a pleasingly striped “DEUTSCHLAND”, to leave anyone standing behind you in little doubt as to what country you are aligned. The font is similar to, and probably a reference to, Germany’s 2018 kit font, but not the same:

Last but not least, as we move to the east, is an Adidas Originals t-shirt that is of the same fabric as a football shirt. What’s more, it seems to have been inspired by one of the most famous designs in the football world, albeit not the exact same design.

Once again using True Colours as a reference, the original template was classified as the Ipswich, and as well as it’s famous use by the Netherlands and West Germany away, it was also seen applied to the colours of USA and East Germany. The American version differed from the rest as it’s geometric blocks face downwards rather than up, similar to how the middle-section of our shirt is pointing downwards, but the colourway makes it seem like something East Germany could have worn in an alternate, slightly more-advanced 1989 reality:

The round-neck collar that is used adds to the other-timeline-ish vibe, and is a welcome choice in our book (also note the huge difference in size of the Adidas font to the Aberdeen-template shirt above).

But again, the main body of the shirt can be seen in several different ways depending on how you view it. Do four triangle blocks of virtual cheese descend down the centre? Or are they are right-angle zig-zags above light-blue/dark-blue fading horizontal stripes?

*****

What Football Is Supposed To Look Like #10 (Gallery)

Welcome back to the series that celebrates all the aesthetics of old school football that we love. Aside from the fact that the sport at it’s top tier has moved so far away from what it was in the 20th century – bringing with it the non-sporting aspects that interest us more – the progression of technology and society in general that have propelled this change mean that the things we look back on fondly are simply gone forever. Except here.

Previously we have had special focus-installments, such as our look at Belgian league “grittiness” in the late 80s-early 90s, and the wacky world of the football TV presenter last time out. But now we return to a wonderful array of images from all over the colourful spectrum of vintage football.

Classic graphics, banners and pitch confetti, Mexico vs West Germany, World Cup 86 quarter-final, 21/06/1986:

Flag-tops display, Switzerland vs Estonia, World Cup qualifier, 17/11/1993:

Quintessential communist stadium (Ernst-Thälmann-Stadion in the former Karl-Marx-Stadt, named after the leader of the German Communist Party in the Wiemar Republic) fittingly hosting a “Fall of the Iron Curtain Derby”, East Germany vs USSR, World Cup qualifier, 08/10/1989:

Nightmarish masks worn by Dutch supporters, Netherlands, Euro 88, 1988:

Classic graphics and background pyro in Bari, Italy vs USSR, friendly, 20/02/1988:

Beautiful 70s scoreboard in Rheinstadion, Düsseldorf (Bökelbergstadion was being renovated), displaying an astounding scoreline (game would ultimately end 12-0) of one “Prussia” over another, Borussia Mönchengladbach vs Borussia Dortmund, Bundesliga, 29/04/1978:

From the same match as above – in which ‘Gladbach hoped to outscore first place 1.FC Köln to clinch the title on the last day of the season – fans listen to Köln vs St. Pauli on the radio (a game that would end 5-0 to give Köln championship), Borussia Mönchengladbach vs Borussia Dortmund, Bundesliga, 29/04/1978:

Memorable sponsor ‘Jesus Jeans’ at the San Siro, Italy vs Uruguay, friendly 15/03/1980:

The gargantuan, eastern majesty of Stadion Crvena Zvezda, with Belgrade looming in the background, for a rescheduled game that had been abandoned the previous day after 63 mins due to dense fog, Red Star Belgrade vs Milan, European Cup 10/11/1988:

Conversely to the classic communist Olympic bowl, the American other-sports arena; here the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium, Washington DC (home to the Howard Bison college American football team at the time), USA vs Ireland, US Cup 92, 30/05/1992:

The setting sun silhouettes a treeline behind the Drumcondra End of Tolka Park (played there as Richmond Park was too small), with a large Irish-tricolour draped above the goal, St. Patrick’s Athletic vs Hearts, UEFA Cup first round-1st leg, 07/09/1988:

An ominous line of riot police guard the pitch in Heysel Stadium as a penalty is about to be scored, Club Brugge vs KV Mechelen, Belgian Cup final, 15/06/1991:

Classic graphics and crest (and a multitude of extra people on and around the pitch), FC Nantes vs Paris Saint-Germain, Coupe de France final, 11/06/1983:

Architecture with local character at Eastville Stadium, and beds of flowers behind the goal, Bristol Rovers vs Sheffield United, Watney Cup final, 05/08/1972:

Oppressive fencing and concrete wastelands, Ajax Amsterdam vs Den Haag, Eredivisie, 27/08/1986:

Great Yugoslav tracksuits of the early 90s, Yugoslavia vs Northern Ireland, Euro qualifier, 27/03/1991:

Children in Swiss club kits ahead of the international match, Switzerland vs Scotland, Euro qualifier, 11/09/1991:

Flares on the tribune and a unique end, Hajduk Split vs Partizan Belgrade, Yugoslav League, 19/11/1989:

A regiment of Spanish police attentively watch the corner kick, Brazil vs Italy, World Cup 82 second round-Group C, 05/07/1982:

Sad Honduran, Mexico vs Honduras, World Cup qualifier, 11/11/2001:

Dancing in the snow manager, Blau-Weiß 1890 Berlin vs Hertha Berlin, 2.Bundesliga, 16/03/1985:

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Mexico vs West Germany, 1986
Switzerland vs Estonia, 1993
East Germany vs USSR, 1989
Netherlands, 1988
Italy vs USSR, 1988
Borussia Mönchengladbach vs Borussia Dortmund, 1978
Italy vs Uruguay, 1980
Red Star Belgrade vs Milan, 1988
USA vs Ireland, 1992
St. Patrick’s Athletic vs Hearts, 1986
Club Brugge vs KV Mechelen, 1991
FC Nantes vs Paris Saint-Germain, 1983
Bristol Rovers vs Sheffield United, 1972
Ajax Amsterdam vs Den Haag, 1986
Yugoslavia vs Northern Ireland, 1991
Switzerland vs Scotland, 1991
Hajduk Split vs Partizan Belgrade, 1989
Brazil vs Italy, 1982
Mexico vs Honduras, 2001
Blau-Weiß 1890 Berlin vs Hertha Berlin, 1985

*****