Pixel Jersey Remix #2 – Romania Away 1994

For all the info on this new monthly series, click here for the first installment where we took Ireland’s first Umbro away jersey to the moon and back. Now, from the same year but a few months earlier, Adidas’ Romania away shirt as seen at the 1994 World Cup (identical in design to the home) gets the Pixel Jersey Remix treatment.

Original design:

*****

 

 

 

 

 

Aesthetically Pleasing Moments From Video Game Football History #12

Last time in APMFVGFH we looked at the odd but lovable Libero Grande, which started life as an arcade game in 1997 before going to PlayStation. For this edition we rewind the clock back seven years further, when another unique and colourful football title was hitting Japanese arcades.

**Credit to the original YouTube uploaders playing the game: CheesestringXX and syndromtr**

As you can see, the game for this installment is Taito‘s Football Champ, which debuted in arcades in 1990 before a version was adapted for Super Nintendo and Amiga. To give the image above it’s full presentation:

This intro graphic is followed by a nice team-select screen with the Maracana Stadium in the background. There are eight countries to choose from, after which one of four star players must be picked for your team:

Of course all these players have brilliant and hilarious faces, which smile when selected:

Heading to the gorgeously vivid match itself, the faces get even better when we see the commentators who are shown before kick-off (here between Brazil and France, we’re not even going to get into the wrong kit colours this time) and during crucial moments. One, who’s presumably meant to be Brazilian, looks like some sort of mutant-alien dressed as a human, and the other is vaguely, familiarly French:

Some other nice details in a classic Japanese animation sort of way include the balding, rotund referee; a goalkeeper with excellent posture and a tiny waist; and photojournalists sitting next to the goal:

Checking out the photographers on the other side of the goal, it becomes clear that the pitch is surrounded by a running track and sponsors for hip, fake brands like “River” and “Logic”:

More on the hoardings and that area of the ground in general later. Another famous aspect of Football Champ is violence, with foul-moves very much fitting for the arcade such as this beautifully graceful flying knee:

When a foul is committed the ref will issue yellow card, with a red coming after the third foul (by any player). That is, brilliantly, unless the ref hasn’t seen the incident (when he is off screen). In the case below where a nasty punch is delivered, he happens to be very much present (luckily, the victim channels Shawn Michaels in his quick recovery):

A while later, a penalty has been given for another punch (which to be honest looked outside the box to us). France attempt an unorthodox pass-penalty, but, to the commentator’s utter dismay, are then instantly granted another spot-kick with a red card for Brazil:

The player then proceeds to make an insanely long run back to his own half to leave the pitch, even though it is soon revealed that the tunnel is closer to where he has just been:

Having sprinted past own manager and team mates (who evidentially don’t have a bench and must stand all match on the track), it can clearly be seen that an exit could have easily been achieved far closer to where he was dismissed. The manager’s double face-palm may well be for his player’s idiocy, as much as being a man down:

The run is not totally in vein, however, as it does give us the perfect opportunity to piece together a look at more advertisements, as well as fans. Alongside the game developer Taito are fictional powerhouses Marutake and Zatthäus (Maradona and Matthäus?), while the supporters in the stands behind are adorned with scarfs and banners, and the manager of the other team can also be seen:

Back to the second penalty, and while this time a shot is attempted, the huge goalmouth proves not to be an advantage:

Moving to a different aspect of the game, and to the opposite end of the field now, another of Football Champ’s signature features is the Super Shot, or “Super Shoot”:

Similar to the kinds of shots we saw in Nintendo World Cup (which is also quite violent funnily enough, and also from 1990), this can be used by your star player at specific points in the match like when you’re drawing or losing, or when there’s 30 seconds left on the clock. Accompanied by an acrobatic graphic, the shot amazingly sends the ball straight through the net to destroy the advertisement behind:

Pausing before the moment of impact allows us to make out the unfortunate board properly:

The goal produces a fantastic celebration from the scorer, who makes good use of the running track and skips for joy, this time to his tiny-headed manager’s satisfaction:

Hell:

While the goal is scored we also get a nice look at the “curva”, with supporters holding scarfs and flags:

An even better Super Shot is to come, as this time the goalkeeper himself is taken through the net and bounces distressingly hard against hoardings, as a new Spanish commentator laments the situation:

One more variation must be highlighted, featuring an incredibly flawless, multiple back-flip buildup from the German player, while his monocled commentator sneers:

Finally for now in this great, crazy, anime-tinged game (which is only really missing random pitch invasions like in European Championship 1992) is the ability to strike the referee himself:

What a sucker-punch, and the fact that he somehow simultaneously manages to win the ball makes it doubly impressive in terms of the sheer feat. Breaking it down to frames really shows the brutality of the clattering:

It’s ok though, he’s alright if a little dazed:

 

 

***

YouTube videos:

Football champ Arcade. The dirtiest team ever.
Football Champ (arcade) Supershoots with M.A.M.E. cheat

*****

People On The Pitch #11: Northern Ireland vs Italy, friendly match, 04/12/1957

Last time out in People On The Pitch, we checked out a mass-confrontation at Coventry’s Highfield Road as Nottingham Forrest won the 1978 English league title. Previously we have gone back as far as 1966 in this series, with a Wales vs Scotland Euro 68 qualifier, but now we go back further still to the 1950s and a spicy “friendly” game in Belfast that was meant to be a World Cup qualifier.

Background:

Following the lead of the first three football associations in the world – England (1863), Scotland (1873) and Wales (1876) – the Irish Football Association was founded in 1880 while the whole of the island of Ireland was still under British rule. In 1921, the Irish War of Independence, and resulting peace treaty, divided the country, with the majority of territory breaking away from the United Kingdom as the so-called Irish Free State in 1922, leaving the remaining north-eastern six counties to become Northern Ireland.


Flag of Northern Ireland, 1924-1972.

Following the split, the Football Association of Ireland (originally Football Association of the Irish Free State) was created to represent the new “Free Irish”, but both the Dublin-based FAI and Belfast-based IFA claimed to represent the entire island. In football terms there was no Northern Ireland, as the IFA Ireland team of 1880 continued as normal selecting players from both sides of the border, as did the Irish Free State from 1936. Both also wore green with shamrock crests, but at IFA games the English national anthem of God Save The King was played, while at FAI games an anthem glorifying the fight against the same king was proudly sang.

In 1937, the Irish Free State name was dropped in a new constitution, legally creating “Ireland”. Hence, there now was officially two Ireland teams, although one was a member of FIFA (FAI) and the other (IFA) on boycott, along with the rest of the UK nations following political disagreements. In 1946, however, the IFA and the rest did rejoin FIFA, meaning that the “two Irelands” would be present in the upcoming 1950 World Cup qualifiers for the first time, with several players amazingly turning out for both in the campaign.


"Ireland", which shamrock-shield crest, emerge at Maine Road ahead of a 9-2 defeat to England, World Cup 50 qualifier/British Home Championship 49/50.

The undeniably farcical situation forced FIFA to step in to make a clear distinction between the teams. In 1949, this was helped as the Irish had adopted another constitution in which the country was formally declared a republic (a move which alarmed British unionists who saw it as a potential threat to the existence of Northern Ireland), and while not the official name, the term “Republic of Ireland” was made legally acceptable as a national title.

The timing was perfect, as FIFA declared that the FAI’s team be known as the Republic of Ireland, and the IFA’s as Northern Ireland, and that both would stick to selecting players from within their borders (which would remain until 1994 when the Good Friday Agreement made it possible for players born in Northern Ireland to represent the Republic). The North also adopted the IFA’s Celtic cross as their badge; a somewhat ironic choice considering many of their supporters’ hatred for the Celtic culture and language of the “non-British” Irish.

One notable exception to the name was within the British Home Championship, where the IFA were still known as Ireland until 1971. During this time, when the 1953/54 and 66/67-67/68 editions doubled as World Cup and Euro qualifiers respectively (as 1949/50 had been for World Cup 50), the odd situation arose where “Ireland” would be playing in the British tournament and Northern Ireland in FIFA/UEFA competition, within the same match.

After having failed to qualify for 1950 and 54, Northern Ireland would participate in a non-British World Cup qualifying group for the first time in the next campaign. Placed in a tough Group 8 along with Italy and Portugal, each team were to play each other twice throughout 1957 with two points awarded for a win, and a spot at Sweden 1958 for whoever topped the group.

Involved in the first three games, the North started with the two tough away ties first; an encouraging draw was secured in Lisbon against Portugal in January, before a 1-0 defeat to Italy in Rome in April. On May 1st, a brilliant 3-0 home win over Portugal put Northern Ireland right back in contention, before the Portuguese’ own 3-0 victory over Italy later in the month really blew things wide open. The last games were scheduled for December, with the Italians set to visit Belfast on the 4th before finally hosting Portugal on the 22nd.


Some of those in attendance for Northern Ireland's 3-0 win over Portugal in Windsor Park, World Cup 58 qualifier, 01/05/1957.

Before The Match:

With Northern Ireland ready for their biggest international to date, an unexpected crisis struck the day before the game when Hungarian referee Istvan Zsolt was stranded in London due to dense fog. An English ref closer at hand was put on stand-by, but it was decided to wait and see if Zsolt, who was also manager of the Budapest Opera House, could make it the next day.

Meanwhile, the swarthy Italian team – who had already landed successfully – surveyed the sights, sounds and flavours of Belfast:

(The newsreel from which this is from, incidentally, opened with the caption “Irlanda vs Italia”, displaying that the “Northern” distinction was yet to be fully observed inside or outside of football)

But the aforementioned London fog didn’t give up, and it soon became too late for the back-up official to travel either. The IFA offered the Italians a local referee, which was understandably refused (presumably calling upon an FAI ref was out of the question). With the count-down to kick-off approaching, and with thousands of fans haven taken valuable half-days from shipyard work, it was decided that the match must go ahead, but as a friendly rather than a World Cup qualifier.

The Match:

A huge crowd of over 50,000, who have only been informed of the match classification downgrade upon their arrival, pack into Windsor Park. With their half-days now “wasted” on a meaningless match, many disgruntled worker-supporters loudly voice their disapproval, although others are clearly happy to make the most of the day:

From a narrow gap between the terraces, the teams emerge. Despite the black and white footage, at least we can see that Northern Ireland’s green shirt is quite a dark shade, while Italy’s blue crew-neck is suitably stylish (click here for our Politics On The Pitch post explaining why these two and other nations wear colours not seen on their flags):

The booing and jeering from the crowd ceases for the national anthem, but resumes and drowns out the Italian anthem, much to the shock and horror of the away team:

A section of home supporters take their aggression to the camera also, with some choice gestures on show:

The captains and referee offer each a token sign of peace through handshakes…:

…but the negative vibes coming from the pissed-off fans has entered a feedback loop with the pissed-off visiting players, who’s memories of gentile strolls around the capital have now been erased by the perceived booing of their national anthem

Despite the meaningless of the game, the new found aggressive tension manifests in Giuseppe Chiappella punching Danny Blanchflower in the face off the ball, among other incidents, before brave Italian ‘keeper Ottavio Bugatti casually bares several knees to the head:

Of course this type of action is not too unusual for the time, but rarely ultimately due to a referee being stranded elsewhere. Speaking of archaic aspects, here we see the problem with certain types of goal-frames as the ball gets stuck on the roof of the net:

Going back to the disgruntled fans, the same group are still busy abusing the cameraman, but this time with less smiles, as if they are really serious now. One of the ringleaders has switched from the cut-throat sign seen earlier to an upward thrusting motion with fingers held together, which must be popular at this time:

A great camera shot from beside one of the goals displays the density of spectators crammed into the other sides of the famous, old ground:

Some have avoided the claustrophobic enclosures entirely by taking to the safety of the roofs, with classic ads for cigarettes beneath them:

In the second half, poor Bugatti is subject to more ill-treatment as he is pushed to the ground for no apparent reason (while people casually walk across the roof), much to the appreciation of the crowd:

The disgruntled fans, meanwhile, have, if anything, become ever more disgruntled and are still furiously gesturing:

Throughout all this, several goals have been scored. On the hour mark, the fantastically named Wilbur Cush scores his second to make it 2-2, as the crowd gyrate with pleasure:

A while later, Bugatti is brutally hacked down once again as he collects the ball. The linesman in the background clearly sees no issue with the “challenge”:

This time the Italians have had enough, and a melee breaks out:

Shockingly, it is a player in blue who is dismissed by the referee

The fans are now even more riled up, and as the final whistle is blown many spill on the pitch, despite the efforts of a few policemen. Some go to congratulate their heroes for holding their pride in the match, while others have more sinister ambitions:

Before long, vast swathes of supporters are on the grass and the atmosphere is dangerous. Despite the violence of the game, some Northern Irish players begin to fear for their Italian counterparts safety, conscious of the terrifying and telling fact that a Belfast Celtic player was dragged into the terraces and suffered a broken leg at the hands of Linfield fans in the same ground ten years before:

With at least one being carried, the Italian players were quickly ushered off the pitch and down the tunnel, away from the baying mob:

northern-ireland-italy-1957-i

Some of the more bloodthirsty fans attempt to storm the dressing rooms too, but the Italians have made it to safety. Now to do the whole thing again for the rearranged fixture.

Aftermath:

The game was quickly dubbed the “Battle of Belfast” by the media. Despite their escape, the Italian team received backlash upon arrival in their homefront as they were booed getting off the plane; the 2-2 draw would have meant elimination if the game had been competitive.

On January 15th, 1958, the game was replayed in Windsor Park, with the esteemed Mr Zsolt finally officiating. Wearing a fresh new kit and crest, Northern Ireland arrived on the pitch with British Pathé again informing us that this was “Ireland” playing, rather than a small portion of the island ruled-over from afar. This “Irish” side were in luck, as a 2-1 win meant that they would make it to their first World Cup that summer. The Italians may have wanted to stay in Belfast this time, rather than again face the ire of their countrymen upon returning from the match, as they missed out on their only finals until 2018.

*

YouTube links:

England vs Northern Ireland, 1949
Northern Ireland vs Portugal, 1957
Northern Ireland vs Italy, 1957
Northern Ireland vs Italy, 1958

*****

 

 

Football Special Report #8 (Preview) – Shelbourne Fanzine Special

For the fourth time, Pyro On The Pitch has adorned the pages of the illustrious Red Inc. – the longest running fanzine in the League of Ireland, produced by the supporter group Reds Independent of Shelbourne FC. Click here for our now-online debut in RI, with a Shels-focused installment of Pyro On The Pitch (the series), and here for our second outing where Retro Shirt Reviews breaks down some amazing Auld Reds’s kits from the late 70s to the early 90s.

In our last appearance, which will soon be uploaded in full on the website, we looked at the “early modern” periods of certain well known kit features. For this part 2 of Early Modern, we turn our attention to the fascinating, cross-pollinating worlds of hooligans and ultras, and the origins of these fan cultures. Again, keep your eyes peeled for the article to appear online in the not so-distant future, but if you want to get all the latest POTP pieces as they appear, then start getting yourself down to Shels matches.

…some of the earliest evidence for the use of football-related pyrotechnics actually comes from Ireland, and indeed Shelbourne. A report regarding Shels’ victory in Dalymount Park over Belfast Celtic in the 1906 IFA Cup Final states that “tar barrels and bonfires were blazing across Ringsend and Sandymount that night as the Irish Cup was paraded around the district”. Bonfires have deep pagan origins in Ireland, particularly during Samhain (Halloween, the end of the harvest) Bealtaine (May Day, the beginning of summer) and mid-summer’s eve (the summer Solstice), with the flames – evocative of the sun for which later religions would be based on through metaphor – deemed to hold protective powers. By “the time of Shelbourne”, the bonfire and the more sophisticated tar barrel fire (an early flare of sorts?) had been adapted as a form of celebration and sign of appreciation by locals for the team who represented them.

That same year saw altogether more sinister developments over in England, as hooliganism began to lay it’s roots. In the 1880s, the presence of spectators known as “roughs” (a term that should really come back), who’s aim was to cause trouble at games and intimidate officials, already displayed that a form of hooligan had been around, but this was generally an era before away fans. The early meetings of massive rivals Millwall and West Ham United, however, were occasions that meant more than football, as both clubs’ working class followings were primarily made up of neighbouring London dockers, many of whom were employed by rival companies. Competition regarding livelihoods, as well as locales and football clubs, therefore divided the fans, and during a particularly tense Western League match in Upton Park on September 17th, 1906, violence broke out among the unsegregated supporters.

*****

International Duty – Club Banners At National Team Games #9: League of Ireland special (Gallery)

In this gallery series we usually take a look at a selection of supporter banners and group flags of club fans present at games of their national teams, from all around the world of football’s glorious, long-lost past. But for installment #9, we focus in on League of Ireland-based support at Republic of Ireland matches from the mid-late 80s to the early-mid 2000s.

We specify League of Ireland and not simply all clubs of the country, as there are often many non-league teams represented at Irish internationals, as well as some playing in an entirely different jurisdiction altogether (Cliftonville in Northern Ireland’s “Irish League” being the main one, while Derry City, from within the boundaries of NI, are actually apart of the LoI). These will be added at a later date. And of course, there were probably plenty more LoI banners than shown here at games during the time period covered, but the following is what we could find on video so far.

Luxembourg vs Ireland, Euro qualifier, 28/05/1987
Drogheda United:

Ireland, World Cup 1990
Derry City:

Wales vs Ireland, friendly, 06/02/1991
Bohemians:

Bohemiams:

Shamrock Rovers:

Poland vs Ireland, Euro qualifier, 16/10/1991
Bray Seaside Firm, Bray Wanderers:

Italy vs Ireland, World Cup, 18/06/1994
UCD:

Ireland vs Northern Ireland, Euro qualifier, 29/03/1995
Bohemians:

Austria vs Ireland, Euro qualifier, 06/09/1995
Finn Harps (Oasis Bar, Letterkenny):

Ireland vs Lithuania, World Cup qualifier, 20/08/1997
Cork City (x3) and Galway United (right):

Ireland vs Romania, World Cup qualifier, 11/10/1997
Galway United (left), Cork City (centre):

Malta vs Ireland, Euro qualifier, 08/09/1999
Galway United (right):

Andorra vs Ireland, World Cup qualifier, 28/03/2001
Galway United:

In 2003, the FAI embarked upon an initiative to involve the supporters of the League of Ireland more at international matches. The result was a brief golden age of co-operation, with many LoI club banners – including some of the country’s top ultras groups’ side by side – and “tifo flags” visible at games throughout the year in Lansdowne Road, along with several card displays, creating one of the stadium’s most aesthetically interesting periods.

The appointment of “League of Ireland man” Brian Kerr as national team manager might have helped make this possible, as now fans of the country’s oft-beleaguered league were coming together in support along with many Ireland fans who openly sneered at their own beloved nation’s top flight in favour of English football. Before long, however, most of the domestic supporters abandoned the project due the inherent nature of having to deal with the FAI (which is only becoming apparent to casual fans recently at the time of writing due to a recent scandal), and Landsdowne Road’s redevelopment in 2007 sealed this chapter of history for good.

Ireland vs Albania, Euro qualifier, 07/06/2003
Shed End Invincibles, St Patrick’s Athletic:


Shamrock Rovers (Hoops on Tour):
ireland-albania-2003-b

Athlone Town:

Finn Harps:

Shamrock Rovers:

Ireland vs Georgia, Euro qualifier, 11/06/2003
Shamrock Rovers:

Shamrock Rovers (Ringsend SRFC, left), Shelbourne FC (centre):

Shelbourne FC:

UCD:

Shamrock Rovers (left) and Finn Harps (right):

Ireland vs Australia, friendly, 19/08/2003
Briogáid Dearg
, Shelbourne FC (x3):

SRFC Ultras, Shamrock Rovers:

Galway United:

Shamrock Rovers and Galway United:

Ireland vs Russia, Euro qualifier, 06/09/2003
Briogáid Dearg,
Shelbourne FC:

Cork City:

Bohemians:

Bohemians:

Cork City (left), Bohemians (centre, right):

Bohemians (above left, right), Shelbourne (below left), Shamrock Rovers (centre):

Derry City:

Four Five One (fanzine), Cork City:

Shamrock Rovers (Ashbourne Says Howya’, Ringsend SRFC):

Shamrock Rovers:

Ireland vs Cyprus, World Cup qualifier, 04/09/2004
Galway United:

*

YouTube links:

Luxembourg vs Ireland, 1987
Poland vs Ireland, 1991
Wales vs Ireland, 1991
Ireland vs Italy, 1994
Ireland vs Northern Ireland, 1995
Austria vs Ireland, 1995
Ireland vs Lithuania, 1997
Ireland vs Romania, 1997
Malta vs Ireland, 1999
Andorra vs Ireland, 2001
Ireland vs Albania, 2003
Ireland vs Georgia, 2003
Ireland vs Australia, 2003
Ireland vs Russia, 2003
Ireland vs Cyprus, 2004

*****

 

Supporter Snap Back #5: Como vs AC Milan, Serie A, 15/05/1988

Last time in Supporter Snap Back, we spent a little longer than usual on on the background of featured club Leeds United. Since we have a tendency to ramble on as it is, the series returns to it’s ideals now with a briefer look at the last day of the 1987/88 Italian domestic season, and a fan invasion at the game that would decide the title.

By the 87/88 season AC Milan could boast an impressive eleven scudettos to their name, even if the last had been won back in the previous decade. The club’s on-the-field success over the years was mirrored in the stands with the creation of one the country’s first ultras groups in Fossa Dei Leoni (Lions’ Den, named after a former training ground), followed by Brigate Rossonere (Red-black Brigades, named after the the left-wing Italian terrorist group Brigate Rosse) and many others.

The 1980s had so far been dominated by Juventus, with a couple of shock championship wins for the likes of Verona and Maradona’s Napoli, but with Milan’s addition of Dutch stars Ruud Gullit and Marco van Basten in 1987 – along with a weakened Juve – the club looked poised to present a renewed challenge. Napoli again lead the pack for much of the year, but a 3-2 win for the Rossonere over the champions on May 1st, 1988, propelled them into first and set up a title race-finale that would go down to the wire two weeks later, when Milan were to travel 50km north to Como.

Match File:

  • Como vs AC Milan
  • Serie A, 87/88
  • 15/05/1988
  • Stadio Giuseppe Sinigaglia (Como)
  • 26,036 spectators

The team had followed up their victory over Napoli with only a draw the next week, but the side from Naples also slipped up and lost, giving Milan more breathing room and leaving the championship in their own hands. Masses of Milan fans make the short journey up the road to occupy most of Como’s Giuseppe Sinigaglia (with beautiful scenic background), in the hopes of witnessing a new generation of players win their club a 12th league title:

As seen above, the majority of the two main side-stands are filled by the invading army. Continuing down to the curva, we see how Como’s own ultras, led by Fossa Lariana – evidentially named after the Lariana breed of goat previously found in the region (extinct since 2007) – have basically been relegated to the status of away-team in their own stadium by the Milanese giants, but admirably have prepared a choreography in their section:

In the stands beneath them, a mesmorising black, red and white dance is played out as many Milan flags are expertly twirled:

More professional flag wavers (among other abilities) are to be found at the far corner of the ground as well, as this is where the groups banner of Fossa Dei Leoni and Brigate Rossonere are located:

In fact the entire end is also completely full of Milan tifosi, with another (after Como’s) Italian flag-themed display prepared and more seas of pleasing flags:

As the teams finally emerge from the the tunnel, flares and smokes are seen in the home section:

At the other end is an awe-inspiring sight as the away fans unleash their own huge smoke-show, on front of the epic backdrop of the mountains:

The visitors start perfectly with a goal after just two mins before Como equalise even earlier in the second half, but as Napoli are again on their way to defeat in the other important game, the scudetto ultimately belongs to Milan. Queue great graphics – which would fit in well in our What Football Is Supposed To Look Like series – explaining such:

Scenes of jubilation from around the stadium ensue:

The players follow suit by commandeering flags for themselves and parading them on a victory lap, while a reporter tries to catch a literal dash interview with the new champions:

*

YouTube Links:

Como vs AC Milan, 1988
Como vs AC Milan, 1988

*****

 

Politics On The Pitch #6: Groups Of Death Part 3 – 1980-89

In this addition to the Politics On The Pitch series we come to the third installment of “Groups Of Death”, where qualifier/tournament groups and matches of dark political significance are discussed. Part 1 covered both the post-War period and the turbulent 1960s (also check out Politics #3 regarding 1950 World Cup qualifying as a “proto-Groups of Death”), while Part 2 looked at the even more turbulent 70s. Now, with plenty more hot encounters yet to come, the fascinating 1980s gets it’s turn.

  • World Cup 1982 qualifiers

AFC and OFC Final Round

New Zealand
Saudi Arabia
Kuwait
China PR

While most of the qualifiers for Spain 82 were devoid of political tension – apart from the now usual east vs west clashes in Europe – there was one strange situation in the Asian and Oceanian zone that caused matches to be moved to a neutral ground, due to a lack of diplomatic relations.

The zone was initially broken into four groups, with one side progressing from each:

1. The Southeast Asian and Oceanian group of Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia, Chinese Taipei (Republic of China), and Fiji, with the teams playing each other twice.

2. The Middle East group of Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Qatar, Bahrain, Syria, with with the teams playing each other once.

3. The “we don’t like our neighbours” group of South Korea (to avoid North Korea) and Kuwait (the Middle Eastern country with the greatest freedom of expression and “liberal values”) combined with the “other south east Asians” (Malaysia and Thailand), with the teams again only playing each other once.

4. The Far East group of China PR (People’s Republic of China), Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, North Korea and Macau (competing under the flag of Portugal as a Portuguese dependent territory).

Perhaps due to the presence of North Korea, the last group was designed as a tournament with all the games played in Government Stadium, Hong Kong, from December 21st, 1980, to January 4th, 1981. A round of classification matches to determine seeds came preceded two groups of 3 and after playing each other once, the top two in each went through to semi-finals and a final to determine the winner – China PR.

But this Hong Kong-based Group 4 is not the neutral ground-affair to which we were referring to, as of course it was home soil for one of the teams anyway. The issue would arise due to the seemingly innocuous pairing of China PR – taking part for the first time in 25 years – with Saudi Arabia, along side Australia and Kuwait in a final group round from which the top two countries would qualify for the World Cup (a first for Asia).

The origins of the problem dated back to the Chinese civil war and the victory of communist forces in 1949, when the creation of the People’s Republic of China drove the government of the Republic of China – which had officially ruled since 1912 – to flee to the island of Taiwan. After original annexation from the Dutch by Qing Dynasty China in 1683, Taiwan had been under control of Imperial Japan from 1895 until their World War 2 defeat in 1945 when Republican China took control of the territory on behalf of the Allies.

Following their exile in 49, the Republican regime continued it’s own rule with what would go on to be variously known as the “Republic of China (Taiwan)”, “Republic of China/Taiwan”, “Taiwan (ROC)”, or, in sport, “Chinese Taipai” (see below). But the People’s Republic, who did not recognise the legitimacy of the island-isolated state, never gave up their own claim for Taiwan as part of China as a whole.


Flag of the Republic of China/Taiwan.

In the Middle East most countries established diplomatic links to the new “red” China, but there was one notable exception in Saudi Arabia who instead maintained their ties to the ROC. Taiwan was desperate not to lose the relationship due it’s reliance on Saudi oil and cited their respect for the country’s Islamic devotion, fittingly appointing a Hui Muslim general as Ambassador in the 1950s.

In 1971, the friendship held fast even as Taiwan was replaced on the United Nations Security Council, and in the UN altogether, by the People’s Republic as the only Chinese representatives (thanks to a motion by Albania, with Taiwan still no longer member at the time of writing). A trade-agreement between the two states was signed in 73, with agricultural, technological and construction-based assistance provided by the Taiwanese, with oil flowing in the other direction.

Throughout this time, Saudi Arabia and China PR were of course politically estranged, having found themselves on either side of the Cold War divide. Thanks to sport though, the two did find themselves having to interact through their national football teams, who first met at the 1978 Asian Games in neutral Bangkok (finishing 1-0 to China).

When the pair had then ended-up drawn together again for the World Cup 82 qualifying group, the games were due to be held on a home and away basis, but lack of diplomatic relations meant that this was impossible. A neutral venue for both matches was decided upon instead, with the south east once more deemed a suitable location as Malaysia was chosen.

The two ties were scheduled for November 12th and 18th, 1981, in Merdeka Stadium, Kuala Lumpur. The Chinese again proved the stronger of the two with 4-2 and 2-0 wins, amazingly on front of huge crowds of 40,000 and 45,000.


The Chinese and Saudi Arabian teams take to the field for the first of their two World Cup qualifiers in Kuala Lumpur, November 12th, 1981.

The victories weren’t enough in the end for China, as they finished 3rd in the group. But because their goal difference was level with New Zealand above them, a play-off was ordered, with the New Zealander’s superior goal’s scored tally and head-to-head record not considered tie-breakers in the rules of the time.

On front of another amazing 60,000 fans in Singapore New Zealand won 2-1 to send them to their first World Cup, along with fellow debutantes Kuwait as group winners, while China PR would have to wait until 2002. As of writing, Chinese Taiwan/Taipei have yet to make a World Cup finals, but we can’t wait for the inevitable, juicy Chinese derby at Brunei 2038 or something.

As for Saudi Arabia and Taiwan, the relationship did not last. As of 1989, the Saudis were the only Middle Eastern country yet to hold diplomatic ties with China PR, but tellingly, following the Tienanmen Square massacre, they had a change of heart. In July 1990, Saudi Arabia and China PR finally established relations, and in doing so ended over 40 years of the Saudi-Taiwanese alliance.

  • World Cup 1986 qualifiers

AFC Zone Group 4A

China PR
Hong Kong
Macau
Brunei

Staying with the China-theme, another interesting scenario arose in the next qualification campaign when the People’s Republic was again placed in an East Asian group with two Chinese territories currently ruled by European powers, along with Brunei. Macau on the southwestern Chinese coast had been a Portuguese trading post in the 17th century when still under Chinese rule, before Portugal were officially given power in 1887 (until 1999), while the islands and peninsula of near-by Hong Kong were taken by the British following the first and second Opium Wars in 1860 and 1898, respectively, but ultimately only for a 99 year lease.

Going into the qualifiers, China were undefeated against their Hong-Kongese cousins since the two first met in 1978, with three wins and one draw. The Chinese were heavy favourites to progress from the group, from which the winners would enter semi-finals and finals to determine one of two Asian representatives at the World Cup (or maybe three, due to the now separate Oceanian (supposedly) zone, but we’ll get to that).

While 495 watched Macau take on Brunei on February 17th, 1985, Hong Kong and China kicked off their own campaigns in Government Stadium, Hong Kong Island, on front of more than 20,000 supporters with the home side able to hold their much larger opponents to a scoreless draw. The Chinese showed their real strength in the games that followed, however, winning 0-4 away to Macau (on front of a swelling crowd of 1048), 8-0 at “home” to Brunei six days later (held also in Macau for convenience since Brunei were already there, on front of  960), 4-0 away to Brunei (but held in Hong Kong), and 6-0 finally at home to Macau, on front a far healthier 30,000 in Worker’s Stadium, Beijing, on May 12th.

Since Hong Kong had also won the rest of their matches (including another 8-0 thrashing of the poor Bruneians, three days before they suffered the same tally to China), this left the final group game between the two five days later on May 19th, 1985, as a virtual play-off for progression. As well as home advantage, the Chinese’ scoring prowess gave them the edge as their superior goal difference meant that a draw would be enough, leaving Hong Kong with the daunting task of needing a win in their estranged birth-father’s backyard.

80,000 citizens of the People’s Republic attended the “unusually tense” (according to the commentators) game in Worker’s Stadium and were duly shocked when Cheung Chi Tak gave the British colony the lead with a brilliant top-corner free kick on 19 minutes. Li Hui equalisied shortly after for the hosts, but, even more shockingly, the fabulously named Ku Kam Fai scored what would turn out to be the winner for Hong Kong on the hour mark.


The wonder-strike that put Hong Kong 1-0 up in Beijing, en route to the 2-1 scoreline that would eliminate China, May 19th, 1985.

After the heartbreak of the New Zealand play-off in 1981, China were again knocked out by the same scoreline, but his time it was on home soil and the disaffected Chinese supporters began to riot in the stadium following the full-time whistle. The People’s Armed Police were forced to move in to restore order, making 127 arrests. It was the first episode hooligan trouble in Chinese nation team history.


Hong Kong players celebrate their victory over China before trouble kicks off around the stadium, May 19th, 1985.

The affair would come to be known as the May 19th Incident, even by FIFA in their official video about the match which conveniently forgets to mention any of the trouble afterwards that actual made it an “Incident.” But in a move that would probably not have occurred in the west, both the Chinese manager and chairman of the Chinese Football Association resigned after in the wake of the defeat.

Hong Kong, meanwhile, were drawn against Japan in the semi-finals, where they were beaten 5-1 over two legs but with a very respectable turn-out of 28,000 in the home game when already 3-0 down. The territory was returned to China in 1997 upon completion of the British lease, but, in recognition of the distinctly separate entity that it had become, as a Special Administrative Region rather than a totally integrated Chinese province. This meant that Hong Kong were able to keep their international football team, with the 1985 victory over their now reunited father-land still the team’s most memorable football achievement to date.

AFC Zone Groups 1B and 2B

Iraq
Qatar
Jordan
Lebanon

Bahrain
South Yemen
Iran

Moving to the other side of the continent, the West Asian zone was comprised of Group 1A, 1B, 2A and 2B. An increase of participating nations had bloated the section, with teams like Oman, Lebanon, and North Yeman set to take part for the first time (the former pair actually withdrew before playing a match), and the return of Iran since their last appearance at the finals itself in 1978.

Iran had intended to take part in the 82 qualifiers, but, due to the outbreak of the Iran-Iraq war in 1980, had withdrawn before the campaign began. By the time the of the next qualifiers the war was still ongoing. however under the condition that their home games be played on neutral ground both Iran and Iraq were entered into the qualification system.

Of course, like others in similar situations, the rival-nations were kept apart in the carefully arranged groups: Iraq joined Qatar, Jordan and Lebanon in 1B, while Iran were placed in 2B alongside Bahrain and South Yemen. The South Yemenese were another side competing in their first, and –  as it would turn out – only qualifiers, having only been independent since 1967 and reunified with the North in 1990 following the collapse of communism.

Iraq started their campaign taking on the Lebanese in Kuwait City. Lebanon had been going through their own devastating civil war since 1975 (to 1990) and were also under orders to play on neutral soil, so the return game took place in the same venue three days later – both won by the Iraqi’s 6-0 (the Jordan vs Qatar match also oddly took place in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia).

Following further thrashings at the hands of the Qataris (7-0 and 0-8, both held in Qatar) Lebanon decided enough was enough and withdrew, rendering all their matches so far void (not that it mattered much). Having won in Ammam, Jordan, but defeated in Doha, Qatar, Iraq finished the group with 2-0 and 2-1 victories over the same opposition in Kuwait, and, somewhat strangely, Calcutta, India, respectively, en-route to qualification for their first World Cup.


Iraq and Qatar play out their World Cup qualifier in Yuva Bharati Krirangan Stadium, Calcutta, India, May 5th, 1985,

Group 2B, on the other hand, couldn’t have been more of a different story, as Iran refused the condition of playing their home games on neutral ground. As a result, the Iranians had entered and left before kicking a ball for a second consecutive World Cup. But unlike 82, when they withdraw, this time elimination came via disqualification.

Oceanian Zone

Australia
New Zealand
Israel
Chinese Taipei

Perhaps with a view to keeping certain countries confined to a distant international wasteland/safe-haven for political reasons, but done under the guise of giving the OFC teams their own section, a new Oceanian qualifying zone was created. The winner of the single group of four would progress not to the World Cup, but a play-off against the runners-up of UEFA Group 7.

Australia and New Zealand of course entered, but this time no Fiji. Instead, the locations of other two teams in the group, Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and Israel, ranged from “not really near” to “nowhere near”, in relation Australia and New Zealand.

The reason was of course to keep Taiwan – competing as Chinese Taipai due to an agreement with China PR to recognise each other in terms of International Olympic Committee activities – away from China PR, for reasons we have discussed above. Meanwhile, Israel were still outcast from their Middle Eastern neighbours who had  refused to play them since the team evolved from the previous Palestinian British Mandate in 1948.


Chinese Taipai Olympic flag.

As we have seen earlier in the series this was not without precedent, after apartheid-South Africa’s (intended) entry to the Asia/Oceanian zone in 1966, Rhodesia in 1970, and Israel’s positioning in the east-Asian side of the draw throughout the 70s. For the 82 edition Israel switched back to UEFA, where they had last been in 1962 in one of the strangest qualification groups of all time (played as a mini-tournament) due to it’s additional inclusion of Ethiopia, alongside Italy Cyprus, and Romania.

As a weaker, visiting team in the zone, Taipei did not play any of their home games in Taiwan but instead used their opponent’s grounds, with the return game in the same location a few days later. They conceded 36 goals and scored 1 over the six encounters in September and October, 1985. Israel were not so willing to give up home advantage, meaning the Asian and Oceanian sides were forced to travel to the other side of the globe to play their away matches there.

Despite a 3-0 victory over New Zealand on the last day of the group, there would be no repeat of 1970 when Israel had qualified for the their only finals to date by defeating Australia in a two legged AFC/OFC final round. This time the Australians progressed in top-spot from this “island of misfit toys” zone, but still ended up losing out to Scotland in the inter-confederation play-offs.

  • World Cup 1986

Quarter-Finals

Argentina
England

Despite being one of the most famous matches of all time, it would have been remiss of us not to cover the clash between Argentina and England in the summer of 1986, which took place just four years after the Falklands War between the two countries (or more correctly, between Argentina and the UK). The Falkland/Malvinas Islands were first claimed by English settlers in 1764 and would go on to be a subject of dispute among British, French and Spanish colonialists, as well as by the near-by United Provinces of the River Plate – later Argentina.

By 1833 the United Provinces had appointed a Governor to the “Islas Malvinas”, as they called them, and curtailed sealing rights assumed by the US and UK, resulting in the arrival of an American warship and British military “task-force”. The Argentinians peacefully abandoned the islands, which would remain thereafter in the hands of the UK –  first as Crown Colony, later as a British Dependent Territory in 1981.

In 1976, an Argentinian military junta seized power after a right-wing coup d’état, murdering thousands of civilian opponents in the process. The finest moment for the new ruling generals would come two years later when the football-crazy country hosted the World Cup, and won – mainly, it is presumed, thanks to heavy government influence over officiating and at least one significant bribe.

But this “sporting” success and the patriotic euphoria that it brought weren’t enough to paper over the cracks in society, and by the early 80s – after two changes in dictator – civil unrest had grown amid dire economic stagnation. As is often the case, the solution was to appeal to nationalistic sentiment by retaking the Malvinas for Argentina, under the false assumption that the British had lost interest in the islands and would not respond to an invasion (the junta were also working with the CIA in Nicaragua and hoped, as a reward, that the USA would also turn a blind-eye).

Having already severed relations in the lead-up, the war began when Argentinian troops landed and occupied the islands on April 2nd, followed by the invasion of South Georgia and the Sandwich Islands (other near-by British possessions in the South Atlantic). The militarily-superior British responded rapidly, as the Falklands Task Force set sail on from England April 5th, and, after more than two months of fighting and hundreds of causalities one each side, Argentina surrendered on June 15th.

Contrary to what it had set out to do, the junta found it’s image shattered and in 1983 a general election restored democracy to Argentina. But one right-wing regime had in fact benefited from the conflict, as Margaret Thatcher’s Conservative government surged ahead in the polls in the aftermath of her boy’s victory.

Thankfully for the footballing authorities, the two were not on course to meet at that summer’s 1982 World Cup in Spain – which had kicked-off two days before the end of the war – unless both reached the final. It was unlikely and proved not to be the case for either, but what a final that would have been.

Four years later in Mexico, the final again seemed like the only place that the two would meet, as the winners of Argentina’s Group A and England’s Group F would be placed on either side of the draw in the knock-out rounds. The Argentinians progressed in first place as expected, with wins over South Korea and Bulgaria while drawing with Italy, but in Group F a shock defeat at the hands of the Portuguese and a 0-0 draw with Morocco meant that England’s saving 3-0 win over Poland put them through in second.

A quarter-finals meeting was now a distinct possibility, which would be the first between the two in a World Cup finals match since a bitter affair on British soil in 1966 when England manager Alf Ramsey had infamously called the opposition “animals”. On June 16th, Argentina dismissed their Uruguayan neighbours to secure the first quarter-final spot, with England also warming up against South American opposition two days later when they defeated Paraguay to formally book the Falkland dream-match.

A stifling 114,580 filled Mexico City’s Aztec Stadium on June 22, 1982, for the much anticipated game, with Maradona the main-event on the pitch. But one problem off it was a lack of segregation in the stands, meaning that clashes between fans were inevitable.

With a combination of alcohol, heat, political-history, tension, football, and a ridiculous amount of people, various violent incidents broke out around the huge ground. Some were involving the more “normal fans” caught up in the occasion and arguing over flag space (with many thefts), while banners from such groups as Portsmouth’s 657 Crew and West Ham’s National Front division ominously displayed that English firms had made the long voyage across the Atlantic too.




Trouble in the terraces at Argentina vs England (above), while some Argentines prove they can take British flags if not their islands (below), June 22nd, 1986.

Flag of Portsmouth's "657 Crew" hooligan firm at Argentina vs England, June 22nd, 1986.

Along with the display of banners referencing the Falklands/Malvinas, national flags were burnt on both sides, as they had been before and after the match when more trouble erupted. In the worse sections of the stadium police eventually made lines where they could, while on the pitch Maradona established some sort of revenge for his people by stealing the show and sending England home.




Banners referncing the Falklands War, flag burning, and police line intervention at Argentina vs England, June 22nd, 1986.

It was to be the end of this period in the Anglo-Argentinian rivalry, as diplomatic links between the two countries were once again established in 1990. Of course in the 1998 World Cup a new chapter would begin, at least in football terms, before a fresh claim to the Falkands itself was briefly made by the Argentine government of 2007-2015.

  • World Cup 1990 qualifying

To briefly update two regions already covered in GoD parts 1 and 2: the World Cup 90 qualification system placed the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland together once again, nearly ten years to the day after their tense debut meeting in a Euro qualifier, while in Central America El Salvador had moved on from the Football War with Honduras in 1969 to continue it’s military dictatorship, before a brutal civil war began in 1979 which was still on going.

In Northern Ireland the “Troubles” were also still flaring, as heading into the first match at Windsor Park in November 1988 there had already been assassinations of IRA men in Gibraltar, murders at funerals and the bombings of military vehicles that year. Few if any fans from the 26 Counties (the Republic) made the journey up due to the obvious security concerns, where a tetchy 0-0 was played out, but the Irish finally enjoyed their first victory against the North in a more relaxed 3-0 encounter the following October in Dublin, en route to qualification.

In the Central and North American CONCACAF zone, meanwhile, El Salvador went into the qualifiers in June 1989 on the heels of right-wing paramilitary bomb attacks against trade-union workers. More violence would come later in the year with a renewed offensive by the left-wing FMLN guerillas in November, followed by the return of the opposing side’s ominously named “death squads” (infamously backed by the CIA originally) in 1990.

Prior to all this, the Salvadorians played their first match against Trinidad and Tobago in San Salvador, but then mysteriously shifted all their remaining home games out of the country to Honduras and Guatemala (although the latter was cancelled as both sides were already eliminated). We are honestly not sure what the exact reason was for this, but given the atmosphere in the country it seems likely to have been related to politics, violence, or some combination of the two.

*

YouTube Links:

China vs Saudi Arabia, 1981
China vs Hong Kong, 1985
China vs Hong Kong, 1985
Iraq vs Qatar, 1985
Argentina vs England, 1985
Argentina vs England, 1985

*****

Pixel Jersey Remix #1 – Ireland Away 94-96

Hot on the heels of the recent debut edition of Kit Interested here on Pyro On The Pitch.com, along with Champagne Kit Campaigns, Retro Shirt Reviews, and the Cold War Classic over on MuseumofJerseys.com, the kit-related content keeps on coming thick and fast. But it’s a little different this time as we present our latest effort, Pixel Jersey Remix.

In a similar vein to the “If Football Kit Brands Made National Flags” series on the POTP Facebook and Twitter pages, here we indulge in some fun with our favourite jersey designs and templates and re-imagine what the shirt could have been like in various absurd alternate realities. Of course for some professionally produced fantasy kits, rather than our crudely rendered affairs (but with soul), check out Museum of Jersey’s Fantasy Kit Friday and their other good works, as well as Kit Bliss who also come up with some great stuff.

For the first installment of Pixel Jersey Remix, we have gone with possibly the most appropriate design there is for this concept in Ireland’s first Umbro away shirt (supporter edition, with some features slightly exaggerated, but then again this is a “pixel version”). Debuted away to Northern Ireland in a Euro qualifier in 1994, the jersey different slightly to the home version through the collar, which featured a button on the first choice. Here we have a look at some away/third/who knows variations, plus a couple of homes, giving some of the best (in our opinion) a close-up.

Original design:

*****

Retro Shirt Reviews #10

Previously in Retro Shirt Reviews we released the originally Shelbourne-fanzine-exclusive RSR#7, taking a special look at that club’s less-documented kit past, but our last true installment was RSR#9 with this mid-late 80s long-sleeve Adidas beaut. If you enjoyed that then you are in for a treat, as we now return with more historic wonders of the football kit-related variety.

  • Club: “Tischler”
  • Year: circa 1984
  • Make: Adidas
  • Template: “Aberdeen”
  • Sponsor: Sport Schöll
  • Number: 4
  • Similarly Worn By: West Germany, Romania, 1984; Schalke, Independiente, PSV, USSR, 1985; East Germany, 1986

If the details listed above look familiar then you are correct, as this is another shirt from the same team that appeared in RSR#9. As is German tradition, the name of the club appears on the back above the number (sometimes seen below) to let us know that this another ‘Tischler’ jersey, which translates to carpenter or joiner. This is not even the first workers/union side of the sort that we have featured following the late-70s Adidas-Erima shirt (sadly sans the trefoil) from RSR#4, the large, amazing woodpecker-logo of which suggests a similar trade.

Unfolding the beautiful, long, three-striped sleeves, we can reveal that this is of course the Adidas “Aberdeen” template (which we all now know the name of, and some other classics, thanks to @TrueColoursKits), with it’s trademark horizontal shadow-stripes and matching collar’n’cuffs, popularly used at the time of it’s release:

This means that we have gone back in time (as is our want) by having already highlighted Tischler’s next jersey after this in RSR#9, as the design was first seen (at least widely) employed by West Germany and Romania at Euro 84 (discussed in Football Special Report #7). Many club sides around the world and other internationals took on the simple but pleasing look over the next two years, in many different colourways, but the most obvious comparison to our version comes from Schalke 04’s 85/86 kit, that used an incidental shirt apart from the sponsor.

As with it’s successor, the sponsor here is Sport Schöll, which we at first erroneously assumed meant Sports School (that would be “Sportschule“). But seemingly, Schöll is simply a family name and Sport Schöll appears to be a sports shop. The close-up also gives us a good look at that oh-so-nice shadow-striping:

Zooming in even closer to the brand logo, we can see that unlike the later shirt, where they were sublimated, the ‘adidas’ and trefoil are printed on and beginning to fade. This was also of an era where the logo-to-wordmark ratio wasn’t what it would become, as the letters are slightly smaller than what you might expect, with the extra “slits” on the trefoil also indicating the early-mid 80s production:

The other stand-out feature of this jersey, apart from the shadow-stripes, is the marvelous v-neck collar and matching cuffs, for which we are grateful to possess a long-sleeved version. As well as the iconic cross-over on the v-neck, the additional blue trim perfectly frames this sublime garment and makes the whole thing pop:

We have already mentioned the sleeve-stripes, but it is always worth re-iterating how great they look when given more length, for which we thank the elements of winter. The label, at which we also sometimes look at, is too creased to properly display, but it is the exact same as that which appeared on the other Tischler model.

Lastly, as usual, we turn over to the back. The same font for the name and the classy “box”-style number that would be seen on the 1986 shirt are already here, with the latter unfortunately not in the best condition. Still, this jersey is clearly a priceless artifact:

International Selection:

Continuing the German theme (which is continued a lot on here, and will remain so continued), we have a unique International Selection with two t-shirts born from Adidas inspiration on both sides of the formerly-divided nation. Unlike our vintage masterpiece above, these are modern “Adidas Originals” creations, which – while perhaps as morally questionable as any mass-produced item from a global, capitalist brand – can certainly still be stunning.

Starting with with the west, here we have an official Germany t-shirt that combines elements of two eras. The most obvious feature, clearly drawing inspiration from the World Cup 94 template, is the striking black, red and yellow pinstripes that stunningly combine to create large diamonds, echoing the original, which meet in the middle as if mirrored:

The abstract design can be interpreted in several ways, depending on how your eyes perceive it. In contrast are the understated, white-on-white stripes on the sleeves, which are not instantly visible. The black v-neck, meanwhile, along with the general shape and feel of the shirt, clearly hearken back to the minimal pre-Adidas West German jersey of the 1960s and 70s:

On the back we get a pleasingly striped “DEUTSCHLAND”, to leave anyone standing behind you in little doubt as to what country you are aligned. The font is similar to, and probably a reference to, Germany’s 2018 kit font, but not the same:

Last but not least, as we move to the east, is an Adidas Originals t-shirt that is of the same fabric as a football shirt. What’s more, it seems to have been inspired by one of the most famous designs in the football world, albeit not the exact same design.

Once again using True Colours as a reference, the original template was classified as the Ipswich, and as well as it’s famous use by the Netherlands and West Germany away, it was also seen applied to the colours of USA and East Germany. The American version differed from the rest as it’s geometric blocks face downwards rather than up, similar to how the middle-section of our shirt is pointing downwards, but the colourway makes it seem like something East Germany could have worn in an alternate, slightly more-advanced 1989 reality:

The round-neck collar that is used adds to the other-timeline-ish vibe, and is a welcome choice in our book (also note the huge difference in size of the Adidas font to the Aberdeen-template shirt above).

But again, the main body of the shirt can be seen in several different ways depending on how you view it. Do four triangle blocks of virtual cheese descend down the centre? Or are they are right-angle zig-zags above light-blue/dark-blue fading horizontal stripes?

*****

What Football Is Supposed To Look Like #10 (Gallery)

Welcome back to the series that celebrates all the aesthetics of old school football that we love. Aside from the fact that the sport at it’s top tier has moved so far away from what it was in the 20th century – bringing with it the non-sporting aspects that interest us more – the progression of technology and society in general that have propelled this change mean that the things we look back on fondly are simply gone forever. Except here.

Previously we have had special focus-installments, such as our look at Belgian league “grittiness” in the late 80s-early 90s, and the wacky world of the football TV presenter last time out. But now we return to a wonderful array of images from all over the colourful spectrum of vintage football.

Classic graphics, banners and pitch confetti, Mexico vs West Germany, World Cup 86 quarter-final, 21/06/1986:

Flag-tops display, Switzerland vs Estonia, World Cup qualifier, 17/11/1993:

Quintessential communist stadium (Ernst-Thälmann-Stadion in the former Karl-Marx-Stadt, named after the leader of the German Communist Party in the Wiemar Republic) fittingly hosting a “Fall of the Iron Curtain Derby”, East Germany vs USSR, World Cup qualifier, 08/10/1989:

Nightmarish masks worn by Dutch supporters, Netherlands, Euro 88, 1988:

Classic graphics and background pyro in Bari, Italy vs USSR, friendly, 20/02/1988:

Beautiful 70s scoreboard in Rheinstadion, Düsseldorf (Bökelbergstadion was being renovated), displaying an astounding scoreline (game would ultimately end 12-0) of one “Prussia” over another, Borussia Mönchengladbach vs Borussia Dortmund, Bundesliga, 29/04/1978:

From the same match as above – in which ‘Gladbach hoped to outscore first place 1.FC Köln to clinch the title on the last day of the season – fans listen to Köln vs St. Pauli on the radio (a game that would end 5-0 to give Köln championship), Borussia Mönchengladbach vs Borussia Dortmund, Bundesliga, 29/04/1978:

Memorable sponsor ‘Jesus Jeans’ at the San Siro, Italy vs Uruguay, friendly 15/03/1980:

The gargantuan, eastern majesty of Stadion Crvena Zvezda, with Belgrade looming in the background, for a rescheduled game that had been abandoned the previous day after 63 mins due to dense fog, Red Star Belgrade vs Milan, European Cup 10/11/1988:

Conversely to the classic communist Olympic bowl, the American other-sports arena; here the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium, Washington DC (home to the Howard Bison college American football team at the time), USA vs Ireland, US Cup 92, 30/05/1992:

The setting sun silhouettes a treeline behind the Drumcondra End of Tolka Park (played there as Richmond Park was too small), with a large Irish-tricolour draped above the goal, St. Patrick’s Athletic vs Hearts, UEFA Cup first round-1st leg, 07/09/1988:

An ominous line of riot police guard the pitch in Heysel Stadium as a penalty is about to be scored, Club Brugge vs KV Mechelen, Belgian Cup final, 15/06/1991:

Classic graphics and crest (and a multitude of extra people on and around the pitch), FC Nantes vs Paris Saint-Germain, Coupe de France final, 11/06/1983:

Architecture with local character at Eastville Stadium, and beds of flowers behind the goal, Bristol Rovers vs Sheffield United, Watney Cup final, 05/08/1972:

Oppressive fencing and concrete wastelands, Ajax Amsterdam vs Den Haag, Eredivisie, 27/08/1986:

Great Yugoslav tracksuits of the early 90s, Yugoslavia vs Northern Ireland, Euro qualifier, 27/03/1991:

Children in Swiss club kits ahead of the international match, Switzerland vs Scotland, Euro qualifier, 11/09/1991:

Flares on the tribune and a unique end, Hajduk Split vs Partizan Belgrade, Yugoslav League, 19/11/1989:

A regiment of Spanish police attentively watch the corner kick, Brazil vs Italy, World Cup 82 second round-Group C, 05/07/1982:

Sad Honduran, Mexico vs Honduras, World Cup qualifier, 11/11/2001:

Dancing in the snow manager, Blau-Weiß 1890 Berlin vs Hertha Berlin, 2.Bundesliga, 16/03/1985:

*

Mexico vs West Germany, 1986
Switzerland vs Estonia, 1993
East Germany vs USSR, 1989
Netherlands, 1988
Italy vs USSR, 1988
Borussia Mönchengladbach vs Borussia Dortmund, 1978
Italy vs Uruguay, 1980
Red Star Belgrade vs Milan, 1988
USA vs Ireland, 1992
St. Patrick’s Athletic vs Hearts, 1986
Club Brugge vs KV Mechelen, 1991
FC Nantes vs Paris Saint-Germain, 1983
Bristol Rovers vs Sheffield United, 1972
Ajax Amsterdam vs Den Haag, 1986
Yugoslavia vs Northern Ireland, 1991
Switzerland vs Scotland, 1991
Hajduk Split vs Partizan Belgrade, 1989
Brazil vs Italy, 1982
Mexico vs Honduras, 2001
Blau-Weiß 1890 Berlin vs Hertha Berlin, 1985

*****